Twins Finally Meet After Being Separated 24 Years

DailyMail.co.uk

Bao Lulin was repeatedly mistaken for another woman, named Yanfei at work, a restaurant in Jiuyang, China. Customers she had never seen before regarded her as if they'd been acquainted for years. Once, a group of elderly women approached her and asked why she had not informed them that she had returned from Fujian Province. Lulin, never having seen these women before, hesitated to respond. One of the women scoffed and said, "You must earn big money and don't want to know us."

Soon after, a teenager eating at the restaurant asked her, "Yanfei, you work here now?"

Another gentleman said, "You look absolutely identical to one of my relatives." Were it not for her pregnancy, Lulin would have begun searching for her mysterious double right then. Three years after her son was born, another customer at the restaurant mistook her for Yanfei. Lulin made sure to get an address this time so she could begin her search, still not knowing that she would eventually find her long-lost twin sister.

Last month Yang Yanfei was playing with her own son when her mother-in-law shouted, "Yanfei, come here now!" according to The Daily Mail.

Yanfei, alarmed by her mother-in-law's urgent tone, ran outside to her. Upon meeting her mother-in-law outside, she saw the back of another woman. When the stranger turned around, Yanfei looked into a mirror, her own face staring back at her. Upon finally seeing the woman many mistook her for, her sister, she said she felt like she had known her for years.

Their similarities stretch beyond their appearance. They share the same friendly demeanor, enjoy similar hobbies, dress similar and eat the same foods.

The most curious similarity between them is a scar on their pointer fingers of their left hands. Both scars came from accidents when they were six years old.

DailyMail.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even their sons share an uncanny resemblance

DailyMail.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In China, baby girls are often given up for adoption due to the One Child Policy, and to the preference of boys. Inheritance laws pass property onto males and males carry on their family names. As a result, girls who are not first born are often abandoned by their parents. Multiple births, such as twins, however, are exempt from the policy. Lulin and Yanfei realized they had been adopted by different people, and were therefore separated at birth.

DailyMail.co.uk

DailyMail.co.uk

Yanfei (top right) and Lulin with Yanfei's adoptive parents. DailyMail.co.uk

DailyMail.co.uk

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